Interview With Turine Viet-Tu Tran

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    Interview With Turine Viet-Tu Tran
     Category:  Spotlights

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     Artist's Website:  [link]

    I was born and grew up in Saigon, Vietnam. After beginning my art study in 2001, I followed my life-long passion with illustration through a journey that led from my hometown to Singapore; then a couple of years later, from Singapore to Paris. After that, I went from Paris to Edinburgh, where I did my Master’s degree in Illustration. After working in England for a while after my graduation in 2011, I've been freelancing in U.K, U.S, Vietnam, and Singapore. Now I'm based in Singapore but my clients are from all over the world.

    As I was trained in both traditional studio practice and digital media, I tend to often incorporate hand rendering and digital painting. I love the spontaneity of hand-drawn media but I also like to explore new aspects of digital art to create rich textures.

    I take from children, companionship, nature, and memories of my happy childhood. I’ve worked with children’s books a lot and have been illustrating more than 10 books in U.S and Europe. However, my work is not limited to children. Through nostalgic, dreamy images, I’d like to provoke warm feelings in children and adult-alike, and invite them to a world where a tiny wildflower could become a fantastic wonder.



    What are you working on at the moment?


    I’m currently in my last year of PhD research in digital storytelling, based in Singapore. My research deals with digital media as tools to bring back Asian classic stories in engaging visual forms for a culturally diverse audience.

    What does a typical working day look like?


    I’m a night person, so I work best at night. I woke up late, plan for all the things I want to do for the day. Then I do most of my daily chores and leave the artwork until late when it's mostly quiet. As strange as it sounds, I work best from 2-7am.

    What tools do you use most for your work?


    Pencils, my Mac, and my Wacom.



    What skills have you learnt along the way?


    Digital painting, time management, professional practice.

    What advice would you give to a young creative?


    Don’t fall into the ‘style’ trap and get obsessed with finding your own style at the beginning. Keep experimenting, looking for masters to learn from, or even copy from those that you feel most drawn to, the more the better. Lose your self in the process. Don't worry what people would think. Most of them wouldn't care. Just look for the good work, not your rewards or self-image. At the end, your own voice will come naturally. The good work is the reward by itself.


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